FIND OUT: Is It Viable For A Mosquito To Scatter HIV (AIDS) Virus Into A Person?



The AIDS virus or HIV on used needles is transferrable when injected into a person where the virus can attach to T cells and begin to replicate. The human T cell is a very particular host cell for HIV.

When a mosquito furnish on a person with HIV in his or her blood, the HIV access the insect’s stomach, which does not has human T cells.

The virus thus has no host cell in which to reproduce and it is broken down through the mosquito’s digestive system.

However, every mosquito bite includes a female mosquito looking for a blood meal to feed her eggs. She injects saliva to maintain the blood from clotting, and an allergic reaction to the saliva makes our skin irritably itchy and red after the bite.

The single-celled parasite that triggers malaria, in contrast, can outlast and increase in the mosquito’s gut and grown-up into an infectious form.

The resulting sporozoites then move to the insect’s salivary glands. Due to mosquitoes inject their saliva when they bite, the parasite is move along to the nest human the insect eat on.

In this case the compound interaction between the infectious agent and the vector (mosquito) is needed for transmission. 
HIV, nevertheless, degenerate in the gut before the mosquito bites again and hence is not transferred to the insect’s next victim.

Image Credit: Terminix

Nevertheless, the chances of the execution are almost 0%. For one thing, the mosquito requires a healthy victim within fast buzzing distance of the HIV-positive one.

Even in this problem, the mosquito’s eating routines and the nature of HIV’s existence in the bloodstream still make it hard to pick up viruses to transfer.

Source: Scientific American
FIND OUT: Is It Viable For A Mosquito To Scatter HIV (AIDS) Virus Into A Person? FIND OUT: Is It Viable For A Mosquito To Scatter HIV (AIDS) Virus Into A Person? Reviewed by Artikulo Uno on December 11, 2017 Rating: 5
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